Logo

Presenting with Pizzazz by Sharon Bowman Mind-Map by Eric Bouchet

Add by Eric Bouchet | May 24, 2017 18:55  776 |  22
Presenting with Pizzazz by Sharon Bowman Mind-Map by Eric Bouchet
Download

Map Outline

Book by Sharon Bowman Mind-Map by Eric Bouchet
1 WE REMEMBER
1.1 10%
1.1.1 of what we read
1.2 20%
1.2.1 of what we hear
1.3 30%
1.3.1 of what we see
1.4 50%
1.4.1 of what we see & hear
1.5 80%
1.5.1 of what we say
1.6 90%
1.6.1 of what we say & do
2 Never talk longer than the average age of the group
2.1 adult audience
2.1.1 20-30 minutes
2.1.2 then let them DO SOMETHING
2.1.2.1 w/ what you said
2.2 break lecture
2.2.1 in little doings
2.3 12 Pair Shares
2.3.1 #1 - turn to your neighbour
2.3.2 #2 - doodle the most important point
2.3.3 #3 - turn to person behind you
2.3.4 #4 - stand up, turn to your neighbour
2.3.5 #5 - think of a motion
2.3.6 #6 - represent with a sound
2.3.7 #7 - one way to use the information
2.3.8 #8 - Pop Quiz question to the person behind you
2.3.9 #9 - represent with an animal
2.3.10 #10 - your life depends on remembering what you heard
2.3.11 #11 - stand up, move around the room
2.3.12 #12 - write one word
3 The person doing the most talking is doing the most learning
3.1 Van & Vanna Volunteers
3.1.1 participant write
3.2 Writing Rotation
3.3 Note-Taking
3.3.1 people remember more
3.3.1.1 what THEY write
3.3.1.2 vs. what YOU write
3.3.2 doodles, words, mind-map, …
3.4 Homeplay
3.5 Play break
3.5.1 homeplay at a break
3.6 Wait Time
3.7 Coaching
4 Tell it with stories
4.1 what is most personal is most universal
4.2 2 crucial points
4.2.1 your story needs to be your own
4.2.2 if you quote someone else's story, give full credit
5 Balance active and passive ways of learning
5.1 8 Personal Reflections
5.1.1 #1 - write 3 things you learned
5.1.2 #2 - write one sentence explaining what you just heard in least 30min
5.1.3 #3 - draw a face that represents how you feel
5.1.4 #4 - write question on scratch paper
5.1.5 #5 - write a WOW + a HOW-ABOUT ? on post-it note
5.1.6 #6 - write 3 ways you could use the information
5.1.7 #7 - spend next 4 minutes reading & reviewing information
5.1.8 #8 - draw doodles on the information
5.2 4 Energizers
5.2.1 Micro & macro stretches
5.2.2 Musical mingle
5.2.3 Movin' Madness
5.2.4 Face to Face
6 Walk your talk
6.1 Don't preach about something you are not willing to do yourself or have not yet practiced
6.2 Who you are are speaks louder than what you say
7 Active bodies = active brains
7.1 The body remembers what the mind may forget
7.2 4 Activities
7.2.1 Gallery Walk
7.2.2 Follow the yellow brick road
7.2.3 Steppin' out
7.2.4 Movin' and Groovin'
8 The process is as important as the product
8.1 You learn from pain and you learn from pleasure
8.2 4 Bonus tips
8.2.1 Create a comfort zone
8.2.2 Food is for thought
8.2.3 "Zen" the room
8.2.3.1 mantra
8.2.3.1.1 "I'm glad you're here. I'm glad to be here. I know what I know."
8.2.3.2 take a moment
8.2.3.2.1 to make eye contact w/ as many people as possible
8.2.4 Connect people to people
8.2.4.1 group dynamics
8.2.4.2 3 activities
8.2.4.2.1 TENS
8.2.4.2.1.1 Touch, Eyes, Name, Smile
8.2.4.2.2 Mingle-Mingle
8.2.4.2.3 Birds of a feather
9 You master what you teach
9.1 Make them TEACH to someone else
9.2 4 Activities
9.2.1 Showtime
9.2.2 Terrific teachers
9.2.3 Something old, something new
9.2.4 Shine on
10 Be the "guide-on-the-side", not the "sage-on-the-stage"
10.1 I am the guide who creates the learning experience and then steps back to let the learners take over
11 You teach best what you most need to learn
11.1 Bonus tips
11.1.1 It's OK to say "I don't know"
11.1.2 Feel the fear and do it anyway
12 Endings and Beginnings
12.1 4 Closing activities
12.1.1 Picture it perfect
12.1.2 Wash the car
12.1.3 Reception line
12.1.4 Snowball fight
A1 Credits
A1.1 Mindmap layout (c) 2017 by Eric Bouchet Book and content (c) 1997 by Sharon Bowman Content used with permission from the author Icons from Manuella Langella

More Maps From User